Asia, the largest continent, covers almost one-third of the world’s total land area. Comparing Asia to any other continent would be a mistake for many reasons. The most important thing is to keep in mind is that the beauty of a place lies in the eyes of the one discovering it. As we cannot compare two people, we cannot compare two continents. Each has its personality; each offers something else. That’s why we can look for the differences and positives of each different region.

In Asia, everything is in large dimensions, in extremes: the largest continent, the highest point on the globe (Everest), most inhabitants, the lowest point (Dead Sea), the widest ocean coast. It also touches both the Pacific and the Indian Ocean or the Arctic. Defining the boundaries of Asia is a complicated process because it is a vast and too diverse continent to be quantified by a simple line on the map. However, we all know that the Arctic Ocean borders the northern border, it has the Indian Ocean to the South, the Pacific to the East, the Mediterranean Sea, the Red Sea and the Arabic Sea to the West.

Travelling to Asia

Travelling to Asia offers several options. Kipepeo – tours to North East India provides an excellent trip to the ancient ruins, jungles and the virgin beaches.  All tourists will say that Asia is undoubtedly a fascinating destination. With cultural features as remarkable as it is diverse; it has a gentle and welcoming population and ultimately delicious cuisine. Food, music, art and religion all play an essential role in many Asian cultures. Visitors can discover huge differences from one country to another or even from one region to another. But for better orientation, they will also find western influences due in particular to colonization.

Today, I will review the places in North India that are worth visiting.

Delhi

Delhi – India’s capital is for many the gateway into this crazy subcontinent. Moreover, Delhi really represents India. There is an Old Delhi, cramped, with a crowd of people. Buildings that you would expect to crumble if you touch them. Plenty of bazaars. But this is the real, crazy, authentic, old India.

Right here are two of the most important sights of the city. The Fort and the Mosque. There is also New Delhi, the grand capital built in the time of the British Raj. Here there are great roads, majestic trees, magnificent buildings, and Gurgaon. Where you will find the 21st century India with malls, steel and glass blocks and green spaces. Click here to discover more about New Delhi.

Amritsar

The Indian capital of Punjab (there is also a Pakistani Punjab with its capital in Lahore), slowly recovered from the shock of the Indian army’s partition and assault under Operation Blue Star in 1984. Today, it is one of the most affluent cities in India. Here is the epicentre for the Sikh faith.

An Indian religion born as a reformation of Hinduism too incorporated in the caste system, taking much inspiration from Shiism. The Sikh Vatican is the Golden Temple, an incredible structure with an enormous complex built around a sacred lake. In addition to the permanent chants that can also be found in a trance. Here you will see the world’s most massive kitchen offering free food – in the Sikh temples you can get free accommodation and food, and the food is delicious.

Varanasi 

Varanasi – is best known for the Ganges. And the Indians say it’s “the Indian capital of silk” – in a very silky country! So do not miss the experience of visiting a silk shop (it’s hard, hard, hard to resist not buying). But you’ll also want to take a tour of the Manga Ganga’s shores. Where you’ll be among sacred cows that are cremated, pilgrims immerse themselves in the holy river and temples of all kinds.

Khajuraho

Khajuraho – is a village “in the middle of nowhere.” It has always been, outside of the great roads, and that saved it because the Muslims did not come across this unique temple. Even though they have led the region for hundreds of years.

It was discovered by tourists, who are growing in numbers year on year to admire the “erotic temples.” Why erotic? Because these gorgeous temples are ornated with statues carved in stone of buildings also have some erotic scenes (about 3% of all the views here, but these are the ones that attract … sex sells, right?).

Check this out: https://www.ancient-origins.net/ancient-places-asia/khajuraho-sexiest-temples-india-007337

Agra

The ugliest city I’ve ever seen is home to perhaps the most beautiful building in the world. The Taj Mahal is unique and incredible. However, besides Taj, you can also discover Red Fort, the old palace of the Great Mogul. And the “perfect” Fatehpur Sikri, built by Akbar, the great emperor of India.

Jaipur 

Once you enter the fabulous Rajasthan, one of the most colourful places I’ve ever seen, you will discover a series of cities dedicated to colours. Jaipur, the capital of Rajasthan, is the pink city because it was painted in pink in the late nineteenth century.

When the heiress of Britain (the future King Edward VII) visited the city. So then, pink was depicted as the welcome colour, Due to this, the whole town was painted pink. As it still is today. However, Jaipur deserves to be visited not because it is pink, but because here are some of the most artistic buildings in Hindu India. Especially palaces of the Maharajahs that have led the area to the proclamation of independence – Amber Fort, City Palace, Wind Palace, etc.

Jodhpur 

If Jaipur is pink, Jodhpur is a blue city. Climb onto that rock that dominates the town, where Mehrangarh is located and you will see buildings bordered side by side. Many dyed in blue.

Far from the horizon, the Umaid Bhawan Palace, built by the Maharajah of Jodhpur in the 1930s is designed to give people who struggle with the economic crisis. One of the most elegant and extravagant palaces of India, a country which is known for its lavish buildings.

Jaisalmer 

I love this city, the golden city. Imagine a rock rising in the middle of a dessert on which a mythical town was built.

A city that has changed very little in the last hundred years. And here was an extremely well-decorated palace of the local maharajah, but the surprise came from the Jain temple (another minority Indian religion).

Have you been to India? I’d love to know where you enjoyed visiting and if there are any other places you’d recommend adding to the list. Drop a comment below.

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